Newsletter

Year 2007

Volume 16, Issue 1

From the Chief Editor

In the first issue of the College Newsletter this year, Dr. K.C. Lee shares with us his view regarding the current and future trend in the training in Pathology in the Message from the President.

To go back in time, in this featured article, the Passion for Pathology Runs in the Blood, we tell the stories of two important families of pathologists that are instrumental in the development of Pathology in Hong Kong.

In the Topical Update from the Education Committee, Dr. Edmond Ma discusses the Recent Perspectives in Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency. This is another example where molecular biology is playing an important role in the practice of Pathology.

The 15th AGM 2006 and the 15th T.B. Teoh Foundation Lecture were both well attended. For those who could not be there, the snapshots in this issue can let them take a glimpse of what they have missed.

Download Volume 16, Issue 1

 

Volume 16, Issue 2

From the Chief Editor

In the Message from the President, Dr. K.C. Lee has helped us to clarify the issue related to the ‘professionally qualified directorship’ in the Supplementary Medical Professionals Ordinance. The College has worked very hard in the past years to solicit this clarification from the Government.

The Editorial Board is interested in the current medical curriculum, the ways to promote the image of Pathology to medical students and public, and hearing the voices of the new trainees. With the featured article Paving the Way for Our Next Generation, we aim to explore this area in a coherent manner.

In the Topical Update from the Education Committee, Dr. Cheuk Wah discusses the Impact of Molecular Methods in the Diagnosis of Lymphomas. This well-referenced article provides us with the basic as well as the latest up-to-date information regarding this rapidly advancing topic.

In the Out of the Whitecoat section, three of our Fellows share with us their precious experience in the Yunnan province of the Mainland. Dr. H.K. Mong and Mrs. Marie Mong drove to Yunnan with the HK Police Motoring Club (香港警察汽車會), while Dr. Tony W.H. Shek and his better half, Dr. Ivy S.C. Luk, joined the fund-raising walk by the Sowers Action (苗圃行動).

Download Volume 16, Issue 2

Single Tags: 

Year 2006

Volume 15, Issue 1

Message from the President

I gave the following message to our new Fellows and Members at the last Admission Ceremony, and wish them to take a broader view on their future careers.

For all young Fellows, and even for us who have been in the profession for quite some years, I think we should not stop reflecting our past and debating on our way forward, for I believe it is our collective hope and desires that are important to shape our own future. So it may help if from time to time we could set ourselves free from all busy routine, take a moment to look back on the path that brought us here, and wonder how we should go forward - ask ourselves questions, get a different view, and critically rethink even the most obvious. You may perhaps also agree with me the two things I am going to say about what pathology is not, and realize that the profession may not be what you have taken for granted.

Download Volume 15, Issue 1

 

Volume 15, Issue 2

From The Chief Editor

This issue of our Newsletter marks the beginning of the establishment of an Editorial Board. I am very fortunate to have Dr. Florence Cheung, Dr. K.T. Loo and Prof. Irene Ng as our Editorial Board members. We have named our Newsletter‘ Pathologue ’, hoping it can achieve its function in promoting dialogue amongst Fellows and colleagues in Pathology.

Starting from this issue, we shall publish featured articles that aim to stimulate constructive discussion within our profession. You are cordially invited to send us your comments and views through mails or e-mails. If you have any specific topic that you want to discuss in the future, you are most welcome to suggest to us. In this issue, Dr. Florence Cheung from our Editorial Board has written an article entitled ‘ To Amend or not to Amend ’, bringing out the dilemma we face in report amendment in Anatomic Pathology. When writing this article, we have solicited the views from a number of experienced senior anatomical pathologists; we would like to take this opportunity to thank them for their precious time and effort. Their opinions can certainly provide us with valuable insights in this matter.

Download Volume 15, Issue 2

 

Volume 15, Issue 3

From The Chief Editor

We hope you have enjoyed reading the last issue of Pathologue, our College Newsletter. It has been 15 years since the establishment of our College. In the Message from the President, Dr. K.C. Lee discusses the growth of our College, and the potential to liaise and collaborate with pathology societies nationally and internationally through the Ministry of Health (MOH), the International Liaison of College Presidents (ILCP), and the World Association of Societies of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (WASPaLM).

The College AGM will take place on 25 November, 2006, and the Second Trainee Presentation Session will start at 2:45 p.m. We are honoured to have Prof. H.K. Ng as our speaker for the T.B. Teoh Foundation Lecture this year, and the title of his talk is: The 2007 WHO Classification of CNS Tumours - Some Preliminary Views.

After soliciting input from a number of fellows of different subspecialties, Dr. K.T. Loo from our Editorial Board has written the featured article for this issue - ‘Image Digitalisation in Pathology – The Quiet Revolution’. Image digitalisation has revolutionized the practice of Pathology, especially in Anatomical Pathology. We take this opportunity to critically examine the potential and limit of this technology. We thank all fellows who have contributed to this article. Feedback, comments and sharing of experience, particularly from the private sector, are most welcome.

Download Volume 15, Issue 3

Single Tags: 

Year 2005

Volume 14, Issue 1

Message from the President

Why Pathology Matters? A word to the new pathologists at the 13th Admission Ceremony I wish to extend my warmest congratulations to all soon to be admitted new Fellows and Members of the College. Your success in becoming a specialist is especially welcome and somewhat relieving in times when the prospect of shortage of pathologists is worrisome, when we may edging towards the global trend of manpower insufficiency in pathologists as in many developed countries.

Sometimes I wonder, from the day you decide to take up pathology as your career, what have been your responses to the all-too-familiar question of your parents or friends, when they say: “Well, very good, you want to become a pathologist, but don’t you want to be a REAL doctor? Don't you want to take care of patients? Do you really like dead bodies that much?"

Download Volume 14, Issue 1

 

Volumn 14, Issue 2

Message from the President

One year ago, I had a special meeting with the Pathology Division of the Chinese Medical Association (中華醫學會病理分會) (CMAPD) – not quite a College equivalent but this one is the closest – in Jinan, Shandong, to introduce the College work, particularly on our system of training and examinations. While in many areas, such as in organizing educational programmes or developing professional standards and practice guidelines, we can work further together, I came out from the meeting with an impression that at present there is quite a significant difference in “professional autonomy” between Hong Kong and China Mainland, so that professional bodies there, and not just the CMAPD, are not going to organize independent specialist examinations or training accreditation any time soon. (Remarkably, in a separate session, the CMAPD had also invited the President and Council representatives of the Royal College of Pathologists of the United Kingdom for similar discussions.)

Download Volumn 14, Issue 2

 

Volumn 14, Issue 3

Message from the President

In the past one year the College sees many interesting and challenging developments. For the start, as outlined in the last President’s Message, the rapid growth in the mainland has brought us both opportunities and areas of concerns. The Minister of Health of China, in a recent visit to Hong Kong, has made it clear that he wishes the Hong Kong Academy of Medicine and its member Colleges to share their experience on training, admission and accreditation of specialists with the mainland counterparts, with a view to establish a model for the mainland as soon as possible. With this objective, an Academy delegation, in which I served as the College representative, visited Beijing in May, closely followed by another similar visit in July, and a reciprocal visit of the Ministry of Health’s delegation in August to the Academy and several Colleges, including pathology, and training centres in Queen Elizabeth Hospital. During these visits, we have had detailed discussions on training contents, supervision of training, accreditation of training units, training posts, and organization of examinations and CME/CPD. To address some important differences in pathology practices between the two places, we tried to make use of the opportunities to convince our counterpart that a broader scope for the profession, taking on board all pathology specialties, that is led by medically trained pathologists, rather than non-medical professionals as could be the case in some disciplines in the mainland, should be the best way forward.

Download Volumn 14, Issue 3

Single Tags: